Treatment Programs

Schedule

Tuesdays    10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (Coed)
                   6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. (Women's Group)
                   5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. (Men's Group)

Saturdays   10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (Coed)

Thinking for Good

The book Thinking for Good focuses especially on typical criminal thinking issues such as: Everyone lies, cheats and steals; no one can be trusted; the rules don't apply to them; that all relationships are manipulative.

Target Population and Use

Thinking for Good is used with resistant offender populations in groups. The program prepares the most resistant clients for more treatment. Typically, this program is used prior to participating in other long-term programs.

Implementation Settings

The program is predominantly used in corrections, community corrections and in probation and parole settings.

How It Is Conducted

Participants complete each of the program’s 10 modules before group sessions and share their homework in the group. The program is designed for 12 group sessions. Groups are open-ended in that new clients can enter an ongoing group at any time.

Discovering Life and Liberty in the Pursuit of Happiness

This 109 page workbook is an educational adaptation of basic treatment programs. This book is used in numerous educational settings, welfare to work programs and in settings focusing on helping individuals set goals, work on relationships and become more focused on making positive life changes.
Intensive Outpatient Treatment (IOP)
 
Intensive outpatient treatment programs are clearly identified as separate and distinct programs that provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services. The intensive outpatient program consists of a scheduled series of sessions appropriate to the person-centered plans of the persons served. These may include services provided during evenings and on weekends and/or interventions delivered by a variety of service providers in the community. The program may function as a step-down program from partial hospitalization, detoxification/withdrawal support, or residential services; may be used to prevent or minimize the need for a more intensive level of treatment; and is considered to be more intensive than traditional outpatient services.

At Northwest Recovery Centers, our groups are on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursday’s from either 9:00am to 12:00pm or 5:00pm to 8:00pm. We use evidence based material from Hazelden and The Change Companies.

Relapse Prevention/Aftercare

Relapse Prevention/Aftercare treatment programs provide culturally appropriate services that include, but are not limited to, individual, group, and family counseling and education on wellness, recovery, and lifestyle change. These programs offer comprehensive, coordinated, and defined services that may vary in level of intensity. Relapse Prevention Aftercare programs may address a variety of needs, including, but not limited to, situational stressors, family relations, interpersonal relationships, life span issues and other addictive behaviors. Times for these groups vary.

At Northwest Recovery Centers two tracks.

Relapse Prevention is for persons that have attempted abstinence and recovery previously and have not been successful. This track utilizes Terence T. Gorski’s “Passages Through Recovery” An action plan for preventing Relapse.

Aftercare Track uses two workbooks “Thinking for Good” and “Escaping Your Prison”.

Medication and Counseling Treatment

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is the use of medications with counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders and prevent opioid overdose.

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. Research shows that a combination of medication and therapy can successfully treat these disorders, and for some people struggling with addiction, MAT can help sustain recovery. Learn about many of the substance use disorders that MAT is designed to address.

MAT is primarily used for the treatment of addiction to opioids such as heroin and prescription pain relievers that contain opiates. The prescribed medication operates to normalize brain chemistry, block the euphoric effects of alcohol and opioids, relieve physiological cravings, and normalize body functions without the negative effects of the abused drug. Medications used in MAT are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and MAT programs are clinically driven and tailored to meet each patient’s needs. Combining medications used in MAT with anxiety treatment medications can be fatal. Types of anxiety treatment medications include derivatives of Benzodiazepine, such as Xanax or valium.

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is the use of medications with counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders and prevent opioid overdose. Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. Research shows that a combination of medication and therapy can successfully treat these disorders, and for some people struggling with addiction, MAT can help sustain recovery. Learn about many of the substance use disorders that MAT is designed to address.

MAT is primarily used for the treatment of addiction to opioids such as heroin and prescription pain relievers that contain opiates. The prescribed medication operates to normalize brain chemistry, block the euphoric effects of alcohol and opioids, relieve physiological cravings, and normalize body functions without the negative effects of the abused drug. Medications used in MAT are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and MAT programs are clinically driven and tailored to meet each patient’s needs. Combining medications used in MAT with anxiety treatment medications can be fatal. Types of anxiety treatment medications include derivatives of Benzodiazepine, such as Xanax or valium.

Medications Used in MAT

FDA has approved several different medications to treat opioid addiction and alcohol dependence.

A common misconception associated with MAT is that it substitutes one drug for another. Instead, these medications relieve the withdrawal symptoms and psychological cravings that cause chemical imbalances in the body. MAT programs provide a safe and controlled level of medication to overcome the use of an abused opioid. And research has shown that when provided at the proper dose, medications used in MAT have no adverse effects on a person’s intelligence, mental capability, physical functioning, or employability.

Medications used in MAT for opioid treatment can only be dispensed through a SAMHSA-certified OTP. Some of the medications used in MAT are controlled substances due to their potential for misuse. Drugs, substances, and certain chemicals used to make drugs are classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) into five distinct categories, or schedules, depending upon a drug’s acceptable medical use and potential for misuse. Learn more about DEA drug schedules.

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine suppresses and reduces cravings for the abused drug. It can come in a pill form or sublingual tablet that is placed under the tongue. Learn more about buprenorphine.

Naltrexone

Naltrexone works differently than methadone and buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid dependency. If a person using naltrexone relapses and uses the abused drug, naltrexone blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of the abused drug and prevents feelings of euphoria. Learn more about naltrexone.
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